Projects

DIY | Modern Glassware Made Easy

There is the classic photo of Anthropology glasses circulating Pinterest and Tumblr whether you’re looking for it or not.

It looks a little something like this:

 

I never did understand why someone would pay nearly $15 for a glass with a few colorful dots…

Painting glasses is a quick and easy project that takes a few items, very little time, and produces really amazing results that can last you years to come. And what’s better? You can decorate them however you desire so they match your decor, personality or whatever style you’re feeling at that moment!

My latest glass painting attempt was even simpler than before. I opted for a chic metallic wave for a simple fresh take on vintage gold bar glasses. As usual, I went for wine glasses. You can find just about any glass type you like at the local Dollar Tree, from high ball glasses, stemless wine glasses (like the ones I chose), mugs, mason jars, and more. The options are endless.

In order to make your artwork stay put, you’ll have to track down enamel paint that is food safe. I found mine at my local Walmart, where they have a vast selection of colors, finishes, and textures that become food safe after baking in the oven.

Recently, Michael’s had a selection of Martha Stewart’s enamel paints on sale, so I thought I would give the metallics line a go. She offers glitters, opaque, translucent and shimmer shades. I picked up ‘copper’ and ‘sterling,’ which seemed like two pigmented metallics that would give me the finish I was hoping for with fewer coats than the cheaper stuff. It was only $3.79 a bottle, so still a reasonable option for a DIY.

I started by collecting my supplies. Two glasses ($1 each at Dollar Tree), Martha Stewart’s ‘copper’ enamel paint ($3.79 at Michael’s), detailing tape ($2.99 at Hobby Lobby), a cheap foam brush from any craft supply store, and newspaper to avoid drips.

I taped my design freehand since I was going for a more fluid look, and began coating my glasses with a thin layer of the metallic paint.

It took me three thin coats and I decided to stipple it on for a little more texture, but if you were using a regular paint brush or sponge, you could easily paint it in strokes for a smoother look.

After I finished a coat on one glass the next seemed to be dried enough for the next coat, so I simply alternated glasses until each had three coats and seemed opaque enough for my liking.

I left the glasses to dry for at least one hour and then followed the baking directions specific to the Martha Stewart paints. These required placing the glasses in a cool oven, and turning it to 350. This way the glasses warm up slowly with the oven and do not crack. Once the oven reached temperature, I baked the glasses for 30 minutes, shut off the oven and left them in the oven to cool (again, to avoid cracking). Leave them to cure for 48 hours and then they are completely dishwasher safe!

The Anthropologie knock-off ones I made a few months back have had no chipping or flaking issues, so I’m excited to have these new copper ones to add to my set.

What projects have you wanted to try, but worried were too complex? Let me know below and we can conquer our crafting fears together!

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